Your Money

What’s Working and What’s Not?

Worker’s Day on 1 May is an annual a reminder of just how hard we work for our money. It is the ideal time to ask: “Is it just me working for money? Is my money also working for me?” Here are 4 great habits that will ensure it’s not just you working hard for your money, but also that your money is working hard for you.

1. Make time to make your money work for you
Most of us work at least 160 hours a month for money in the form of a salary. How many hours do you spend on making your money work for you? Make a habit of spending time on making your money work for you, whether it is 10 minutes a day or an hour once a week. Use this time to work on your budget, take care of financial matters and learn more about how money can work for you. 

2. Invest in yourself
Make a habit of investing some of your money in yourself each month, whether by taking a course or buying a book that will enhance your skills and boost your qualifications. This will allow you to earn more for the same number of hours you are already working, whether by being qualified for a higher paying position or by being promoted with a salary increase.

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3. Make more of your money

Make a habit of investing some of your money in yourself each month, whether by taking a course or buying a book that will enhance your skills and boost your qualifications. This will allow you to earn more for the same number of hours you are already working, whether by being qualified for a higher paying position or by being promoted with a salary increase.

 4. Make your money work for you
Financial stress will affect nearly every facet of your life and can lead to problems in relationships, while negatively affecting concentration and focus, your work performance and family responsibilities.

It could also lead to one of several stress-related health conditions which, if untreated, could result in very serious, sometimes life-threatening illnesses, as well as psychiatric and cognitive problems. In fact, two of the most common effects of financial stress are depression and anxiety.